How to take a clean picture of your truck

These are some basic rules to follow – it does not matter if you use a point and shoot, a professional camera or you phone.

  • Make sure you truck is nice and clean.
  • LOCATION! Find a nice open area without any distractions or clutter. Check to make sure that there are no reflections from other “stuff” on your truck.
  • The best times to shoot are early morning or late afternoon. Overcast days are best as the light is very even. If you use a flash – make sue that it does not create any “hot spots” on your truck, the best way to do this is by pointing the flash straight up or away from the truck.
  • Think before “clicking”! Play up your truck’s best features. Have a fancy visor or wheels – play up those features.
  • ANGLES! Bend down and shoot from a low angle, try a three-quarter view, you may even want to get a ladder and shoot from above the truck. Once again, look before “clicking”
  • Lastly, cropping – look at the final shots and get rid of unnecessary arears around the truck.

Have fun with photographing your truck. Send us some of your great shots and we may publish them in our truck of the week.

Published On: March 27th, 2020Categories: Trucks

Electronic Logging Device – ELD

No more keeping paper log books. Forgetting to enter times and dates. Illegible entries.  By December 2017 commercial truck drivers that are required to keep a log must be in compliance with Electronic Logging

All About Dash Cams

ABOUT DASH CAMS Many of us have seen dash cams on TV programs as well as on YouTube. At one time only police and services like them could afford to install a dash cam

Metal Polish

Keeping your rig shinny and polished is no easy task. There are many brands of metal polish on the market to choose from. One of the best liquid polish on the market today is

COVER YOUR LUG NUTS

Ugly semi-truck rims, ugly semi-truck lug nuts! Not since the truckers started covering them with decorative lug nut covers. Lug nut covers started with just some standard sizes, 1.5”, 1.25” to fit over standard semi-truck

Semi-Truck Rims

Since the invention of the wheel, semi-truck rims have come along way. From the wagon wheel to Dayton rims (also known as spider rims) to steel one-piece rims to now Aluminum or Alloy rims.